Visiting Naghsh-e-Jahan Square

For 5 hours
Up to 3 people
Walking
English
25.00 USD

Where We Go / What We Do

Abbasi Jame Mosque (Shah Mosque)

Abbasi Jame Mosque (Shah Mosque)

The Shah Mosque, also
known as Royal Mosque or Imam Mosque after Iranian revolution, is a mosque in
Isfahan, Iran, standing in south side of Naghsh-e Jahan Square. Built during
the Safavid Empire, ordered by Abbas I of Persia.

It is regarded as one
of the masterpieces of Persian architecture in the Islamic era. The Royal
Mosque is registered, along with the Naghsh-e Jahan Square, as a UNESCO World
Heritage Site. Its construction began in 1611, and its splendor is mainly due
to the beauty of its seven-colour mosaic tiles and calligraphic inscriptions.



The mosque is depicted
on the reverse of the Iranian 20,000 Rials banknote


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Sheikh Lotfollah Mosque

Sheikh Lotfollah Mosque

Sheikh Lotfollah Mosque is one of the architectural masterpieces of Iranian architecture that was built
during the Safavid Empire, standing on the eastern side of Naghsh-i Jahan
Square, Esfahan, Iran. Construction of the mosque started in 1603 and was
finished in 1619. It was built by the chief architect Shaykh Bahai, during the
reign of Shah Abbas I of Persia.

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Ali Qapu Palace

Ali Qapu Palace

Ali Qapu is a grand palace in Isfahan, Iran. It is located on
the western side of the Naqsh e Jahan Square, opposite to Sheikh Lotfollah
Mosque
, and had been originally designed as a vast portal. It is forty-eight
meters high and there are six floors, each accessible by a difficult spiral
staircase. In the sixth floor, Music Hall, deep circular niches are found in
the walls, having not only aesthetic value, but also acoustic.

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Qeysarie Gate

Qeysarie Gate

The Qeysarie bazaar or Soltani bazaar is a historical bazaar in Isfahan, Iran. The main commercial activities in the Qeysarie bazaar are carpet and kilim selling. The bazaar was one of the greatest and luxorious trading center in the safavid era.


Imperial Sarkhanh

Imperial Sarkhanh

About 40 years ago this Sarkhanh fell of use and were abandoned. The workshops some 5 to 8 meters deep once produced herbal and seed oil. Qeisariye Sarkhanh is one of the three  (out of the original seven) existing oil presses, from the Safavid era. Although  visiting is limited, it is worth the effort since the art of construction and the architecture are beautiful.